Confession

When you find out you have a GBM, it’s a terrifying and lonely experience. Some may seek other patients through support groups. Some find others through various online sources – Twitter, Facebook, etc. It’s important to find people who have an understanding of what you’re experiencing, to know you’re not alone. Caregivers need those contacts too, sometimes even more critically than the patient. Perhaps you get to the point where YOU can provide that support to others who find themselves with the same or similar diagnosis. It can be very inspirational and motivating. But it can also be very emotional.

Seeing your friends and/or loved ones decline or die – as many with GBMs do eventually – can become too much. Being reminded of what may be in store for you can become more than you can handle. Losing so many people to a disease you also have can send you into a serious downward emotional spiral. It eats away at hope and distracts you from the joys of everyday life. It’s your fate, be it tomorrow or 2 years or 10 years. Watching or hearing that someone is at the end of their journey can pack a wallop to your positive thinking.

And then there’s the guilt. You know that there are others out there that need your support and encouragement. You know that they may be suffering – emotionally and/or physically. You know they’re probably scared. You know they’re worried about their families. And yet, you’re afraid to get too close, become friends only to watch them suffer and potentially lose their battle. At least I am. Sometimes it’s easier to just stay in my little bubble of fear, self pity, and self imposed ‘ignorance’. I’m not strong enough to bear the burden, to watch them succumb to this disease. I’m selfish and uncaring, I’ve abandoned others, I’m emotionally weak. At least those are the thoughts that flow through my mind. It’s hard to admit this publicly, but I’m pretty sure I’m not the only one.

It’s okay for us to admit our weaknesses and fears throughout this process. It’s a whirlwind of emotions and there are good days and bad days. Other patients may have the strength to experience loss after loss and that ability is like a super power. I wish I had that strength, but knowing I could be the one suffering as I die at any point is too much for me to handle. If someone asks for my support or advice, I’ll be right there to offer it. But then I’ll likely retreat back into my hobbit hole of ‘ignorance’ until the next request. Honesty and guilt while compartmentalizing my experience between an open ended death sentence and managing my everyday life – just another part of having an aggressive malignant brain tumor.

7 thoughts on “Confession

  1. Your gift for writing and your willingness to be so honest about all aspects of this is a precious gift that I’m grateful you are willing to share. Thank you! You are in my daily prayers.

    • Amen to Cindy’s comments. May you continue to be graced to be real AND encouraging in the process. You and the family are in our prayers too.

  2. A poetry of inner thoughts. Thank you for being so candid. And I hope you know sincerely truly deeply that you were not alone before, and you live among your friends now. Love, Frank

  3. I hope that by writing, and connecting with others who have brain tumors (me!) you feel just a tiny tad LESS terrified and alone. I know we cannot walk in each others’ footsteps, but I hear you. LOUD AND CLEAR.

  4. I am a one year surviver just celebrated 1/10/15 of my diagnoses GBM grade IV. Had surgery 12/27/2013. You have written so much of what i think and feel also. Thank you for posting. Praying for you.

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